February 13, 2012

What Comes Next?

Posted in Bottineau, Dismantling the back, Renovation, Stone Work tagged , , , , , at 11:22 pm by stonebankblog

Your Stone Bank family is pleased at the progress we’ve made on saving our 1890s bank building. But what comes next?

Rebuilding, of course.

But that is going to take some time and — a bit of money. Quite a bit money.

As the back of the building was recently being dismantled, we got to see what was inside those two-foot-thick walls. Riprap, baby.

Inside the two-foot-thick walls at the Stone Bank

At the bottom of this picture you can see the "face stones" of the Stone Bank. The stuff inside the bank's walls is riprap -- stone, sand, brick and other material.

When the back section of the building is rebuilt — the area inside the walls will be very different. Concrete blocks will be used and the face stones will be placed atop them.

Here’s a picture of the Coghlan Castle near St. John, N.D., and it shows how the face stone is being reapplied over concrete blocks in that project.

Coghlan Castle near St. John, ND

The work to restore the Coghlan Castle shows the construction technique that we'll use on the Stone Bank. The bank's dismantled walls will be rebuilt of concrete blocks, too.

Here’s a link to and National Park Service site about the Coghlan Castle.
http://www.nps.gov/resources/site.htm?id=18262

It’s a great project to save another marvelous North Dakota landmark. And our stone mason says that structure was in much worse condition than ours — and it’s being saved. We take that as a cue to keep moving forward.

Feeling generous? We have a PayPal link on our website: http://StoneBank.org

We love the encouragement.

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2 Comments »

  1. MinnGal said,

    This should be a B&B! Such a cool building. How interesting that you have so many of these buildings built out of stone in that region. Fascinating stuff!

  2. […] here’s a link to an earlier Stone Bank Blog post that shows how we are repairing the Stone Bank’s walls in much the same way as employed at the Coghlan […]


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